Temperament Tips

We have learned about the Nine Kinds of Temperament Styles from the last blog post.


Now here are some tips on how to approach children ...


Being aware of a child’s temperament does not mean shrugging your shoulders and saying, “O well, that’s just the way he is”.

It’s important to help a child develop acceptable behaviors and skills while also understanding that they will have their own temperaments characteristics that will help define them as a person.


For Preschoolers:


« Provide many opportunities for brief, graduated exposure to new experiences (e.g. visit a preschool program a few times before attending).

« Provide predictable routines.

« Talk about upcoming events, giving the child a chance to ask questions and be reassured.

« Use visual cues, such as calendars, to prepare the child for changes or new experiences.

« Try playing out difficult upcoming events, such as first day at school, in pretend play situations. Before beginning a new activity, encourage the child to use his imagination. Together you can “try out” the activity using pretend play.

« Provide plenty of warnings about transitions.

« If possible, visit the location of the new activity before it starts.

« Provide opportunities for success by supporting the child during the new experience. Help him introduce himself to some of the other children, coach him on how to join in their play (e.g. “Can I play with you?”).

« Help the child talk about his feelings. Support him in dealing with his disappointment when things don’t work out (e.g. “You are sad that you didn’t play in the sand table today. It looked like fun. We can try again tomorrow.”).

« Avoid shaming the child or making him feel bad if he was not ready to try a new activity. Acknowledge his efforts (e.g. “It was so great that you put your feet in the water today!”). Encourage him to take the next steps.

« Adapt the Environment. Have areas for active children, have a quiet space, and have sensory items available for children’s use.

« Be Empathetic. Do not overreact to reactions. Alter expectations depending on child’s temperament and development.

« Be consistent.


For Toddlers:

« Provide many opportunities for brief, graduated exposure to new experiences (e.g. visit a preschool program a few times before attending).

« Provide predictable routines. Use visual cues, such as visual schedules, to prepare the child for changes or new experiences.

« Provide plenty of warnings about transitions. Use a musical instrument cue, bell, a song or light switch.

« If possible, visit the location of the new activity before it starts. Talk about new activity and prepare children for this new experience.

« Help the child talk about his feelings. Support him in dealing with his different feelings and feelings of others. You can also use a visual (e.g. say ‘You are Sad’ and show or point a picture of a sad face. ‘Mommy went to work. Mommy will come back.’)

« Adapt the Environment. Have areas for active children, have a quiet space, and have sensory items available for children’s use.

« Be Empathetic. Do not overreact to reactions. Alter expectations depending on child’s temperament and development.

« Be consistent.

Reflect on self and child or children in care:

You as the adult can do this activity by rating yourself and another child.

See what the differences are and form an approach strategy on how to better respond and care for the child.


This will help us see that even if we are different, we can find ways to play, have fun and learn together.
This can also assist you in managing the environment depending on each child's Temperament Styles.

©https://centerforparentingeducation.org/library-of-articles/child-development/

©Pathways to Competence by Sarah Landy

We hope that you have learned something that will help you, as the adult and caregiver, to better support your children and/or the children in your care.

14 views

Child Development Centre Yukon
 

phone: (867) 456-8182
website
www.cdcyukon.ca

emailinfo@cdcyukon.ca

Handle with Care Canada
 

websitewww.handlewithcarecanada.org